Solidarity Statements

Posted on 12 Nov 2018

Arika believes the most important way to exchange solidarity is in practical, ongoing, tangible ways. We try to do this via both our local organising and public programmes. Local Organising involves long term partnerships with grassroots groups in which we co-operate to create events initiated and chosen by the groups. Our public events are always underpinned by a desire to explore processes that hold the potential to bring about an end to oppression and create a society based on love and respect. 

 

We want to create further political clarity and solidarity with all of the people with whom we co-operate to make our public programmes and hope that the following solidarity statements will assist with this. Intersectionality is a term created by black feminist scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw that illuminates “the need to account for multiple grounds of identity when considering how the social world is constructed”.  Clearly no one social identity exists in isolation from another and our identities intersect multiple social groups. This means that within any one social grouping a great variety of experience exists. Yet focusing on commonality of experience (as well as divergences) amongst social groupings has led to both fruitful analysis of oppression and empowerment for its members. We intend for the following statements to be read with this in mind. We also hope the following three definitions will be useful:

 

Capitalism is a global economic system where the means of production are owned by a minority (the capitalist class) and the majority (waged workers) sell their labour in order to gain means of survival. The goods and services produced by those who sell their labour are in turn sold for profit by the minority who own the means of production.

 

Patriarchy is a social system in which men hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. It supports the tendency of fathers (or father-figures) to hold authority over women and children within the domain of the family.

 

White Supremacy is an historically based, institutionally perpetuated system of exploitation and oppression of continents, nations, and peoples of colour by white peoples and nations of the European continent, for the purpose of maintaining and defending a system of wealth, power, and privilege. 

 

The following evolving statements set out some principles that structure our commitments to different groups and communities, and inform some of the ways we collaborate together. The below is also available as a PDF here.

 

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Local Organising Specific Solidarity Statements

 

MIGRANT SOLIDARITY STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our Local Organising programme we want to extend solidarity to migrants via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Migrant led organisations in the UK have consistently sought:

·     A priority of movement for those fleeing war, torture and abuse

·     Recognition that the experience of poverty is in itself a form of violence and can prompt relocation

·     An end to detention

·     Provision of necessary means for a dignified, healthy, autonomous and fulfilled life

·      An end to the violence attending the maintenance of national boundaries

 

We are clear that change on a profound level is necessary for this to occur that would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers. 

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that the people best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions are those with lived experience of migration.  We know that these approaches and ideas are in a constantly evolving process – our aim is to be alongside this process in solidarity as best we can, not to shape it. This solidarity involves recognising that migrants without papers are struggling for the very basis of their lives; sometimes they engage in organised struggle and creating strategies of resistance – at others they are pressed to simply survive. Solidarity in this context involves people without lived experience of being in the (immigration) system doing as much as actively possible to be of assistance.

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SEX WORKER SOLIDARITY STATEMENT 

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our Local Organising programme we want to extend solidarity to sex workers via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Sex worker led organisations in the UK have consistently sought:

 

·      Decriminalisation of sex work

·      Unionisation of the sex work industry

·      Recognition that sex work is work (like other all work it can bring both fulfillment and suffering dependent upon circumstances)

·      An end to the social stigma connected to sex work

 

We support all of these aims. We are clear that change on a profound level is necessary for this to occur that would entail the end of patriarchy, capitalism and white supremacy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers. 

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that the people best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions are those with lived experience of the industry.  We know that these approaches and ideas are in a constantly evolving process – our aim is to be alongside this process in solidarity as best we can, not to shape it. 

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ANTI-POVERTY MOVEMENT SOLIDARITY STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our Local Organising programme, we want to extend solidarity to people experiencing poverty via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Organisations in the UK led by people with lived experience of poverty have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about its end. Drawing upon these we advocate:

 

·      Provision of necessary means for a dignified, healthy, autonomous and fulfilled life to all

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard

·      Collective control of our workplaces and the fruits of our labour

·      Restoration of land, non-residential buildings and items manufactured by conglomerates to collective ownership

·      The development of truly collective decision making on a societal wide level

·      We also recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

·      Provision of a universal basic income (paid to all) at a rate that enables a good standard of living 

·      Recognition of and appropriate support for the specific needs of people with disabilities and/or ill health

·      Rent caps on all rented property and an end to winter evictions

·      Payment of rent costs for all who need it 

·      An immediate end to homelessness via the reallocation of unoccupied built property into collective ownership

·      Re-nationalisation of public transport

·      Payment of reparations by wealthy nation states to those they colonised and enslaved

·      Cancellation of all international debts and an end to structural adjustment policies

·      Solidarity with direct action against poverty - whether that be strike action, pickets, occupations or whatever those directly involved deem best

 

We are clear that change on a profound level is necessary for this to occur that would entail the end of capitalism, white supremacy and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers. 

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people with lived experience of poverty are the people uniquely placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around its eradication. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by people with lived experiences of poverty. However, the process of ending capitalism (a system to which poverty and exploitation are integral) and replacing it with a society based on principals of mutual aid and equitable distribution of resources is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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Solidarity Statements A-Z

 

SOLIDARITY WITH ANIMALS

SOLIDARITY WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLE

SOLIDARITY WITH LGBTIQA+ OR QUEER PEOPLE

SOLIDARITY WITH MEN 

SOLIDARITY WITH PEOPLE OF COLOUR

SOLIDARITY WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

SOLIDARITY WITH PLANET EARTH

SOLIDARITY WITH TRANS, INTERSEX AND NON-BINARY PEOPLE 

SOLIDARITY WITH WOMEN

SOLIDARITY WITH WORKING CLASS PEOPLE

 

BDS MOVEMENT STATEMENT 

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SOLIDARITY WITH ANIMALS STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs we want to extend solidarity to animals – namely furred and hooved creatures, insects, birds, fish and other all living creatures. It is interesting to reflect upon the statement: “Those most directly affected by specific oppressions are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it” in the context of animal liberation. In some ways this is true – animals have instinctive pathways and profound healing abilities that extend beyond the boundaries of the self. For example, when wolves were returned to Yellowstone national park in the US – having previously been hunted to death by white settlers – their presence brought about many beneficial changes. Beavers have returned and willow, songbird and fish populations increased. If animals are given sufficient space and scope their determination to survive, live and adapt is tenacious. Yet at the same time in relation to human’s technological and societal might animals are rendered powerless, vulnerable and subjected to exploitation, torture, abuse and genocide. Some people active in the animal liberation movement speak of being “a voice for the voiceless” and – complex though this is – there seems to be merit in this statement. 

 

The question of how to bring about a world where humans do not inflict suffering upon animals and how this is achievable in relation to our plethora of different human cultures is complex. Arika are motivated by love and respect for all animals. Recognising that humans too are animals, we know that our wellbeing and very survival are inextricably bound up together. Without proscribing what exact forms animal liberation would comprise, we advocate recognition of the following:

 

·      Animals are our kin. 

·      Animals and humans share one world. We have evolved together. Animals are the larger part of this environment. Animals can live without us, but we cannot live without animals.

·      How a human society relates to and treats animals is indicative of the core values and nature of that society. 

·      All animals feel physical pain and experience emotions. 

·      Animals, of all sorts, have intelligence and insight from which humans can learn. 

·      The bondage (and arguable enslavement) of animals predates history, is common to but yet far from universal to human cultures, and is an aspect of human societal development that it would behove us to examine honestly. 

·      The development of capitalism has been and remains dependent upon the exploitation of animals.

·      Various human societies have had and continue to have very different attitudes and approaches to their relationship with animals. 

·      The forms of the animals liberation movement that have manifested in the global north whilst characterised by bravery and insightful analysis have also been beset by sentimentality, racism, cultural arrogance and neo-colonial outlooks. 

·      Indigenous people hold multiple perspectives on interrelationship with animals, emergent from a multiplicity of worldviews. Indigenous peoples and people from the global south have generated much insight, analysis and good practice around animal liberation. The process for non-indigenous people to gain insight into these perspectives is ongoing and requires care and respect. 

·      The scale of avoidable animal suffering brought about by humans is stupefying. 

·      We are experiencing extinction of animal species and loss of species diversity at an unprecedented rate. 

·      The consumption of animals (mammals, birds, fish etc.) for food by humans is a key contributor to catastrophic climate change. 

·      Indigenous people’s hunting practices are not an underlying cause of either species extinction or climate change but, in fact, if managed intelligently by the people’s concerned contribute to a sustainable environment for all. 

·      Respect for the territorial and political autonomy of indigenous peoples and their traditional hunting and/or husbandry practices is key to animal liberation. 

·      There are a variety of traditional cultural practices (of people who would not be classed as indigenous) that involve complex interrelationships between animal husbandry, land alteration and/or stewardship (e.g. through forestry, grazing practices etc.) meat consumption, ultilisation of animal body parts etc. and the current demands of capitalism. To determine how to best move forward and end any animal abuse that exists in such contexts is not straightforward and will involve collective discussion and negotiation. 

·      Denigrating, binary and utilitarian philosophical approaches to animal lives lie deep and little examined in the cultures of the global north.

·      Immediate emergency measures are necessary to prevent mass species extinction.

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

·      Immediate emergency measures to prevent mass species extinction.

·      Immediate ban on all trade involving endangered species, both land and marine, with heavy (but appropriate) penalties for any breaking it

·      A true global commitment to minimising the process of climate change as a matter of collective urgency

·      A huge reduction or almost entire elimination of meat consumption on a global level

·      The adoption of humane best practices in farming involving animals.

·      Maintenance and protection of all existing marine protection areas, national parks, SSSI’s, designated protected zones, UNESCO designated Natural World Heritage sites etc. 

·      Expansion of natural environments that are protected from damage and exploitation

·      An end to pollution of our environment by plastics, dioxins, radiation, heavy metals, genetically modified crops, long-life pesticides, unnecessary artificial fertilisers etc. 

·      Ensure access to clean potable water for all animals

·      Recognition of the particular role the global north and our neo-colonial power plays in animal abuse, meat consumption and climate change

·      An immediate end to the use of animals in all scientific testing. (There are alternatives involving safe and consensual human participation) 

·      An immediate end to all imprisonment of animals that could be successfully returned to the wild

·      An immediate end to the use of animals in circuses, bull-fighting, sea- parks, dog and horseracing, zoos and other forms of live entertainment that involve suffering

·      An immediate cessation to the use of animal labour in war zones 

·      Increased legal and/or financial penalties and/or consequences for animal abuse

·      Increased funding and support to legal bodies and NGO’s investigating and prosecuting animal abuse

·      The creation of public and intimate forums to explore, mourn, discuss, consider, celebrate, repent, express and heal our personal and collective relationships with animals

·      Exploration, for example, of the question – if animals are sentient and sentient beings who have been oppressed by another group deserve reparations then what reparations are due to animals everywhere?

·      Intelligent exploration on a societal level of the variety of factors that lead to abuse of animals with the aim of breaking the cycle of violence. 

·      The inclusion of honest and respectful depictions and documentation of animals in school curriculums and other educational settings

·      Prioritisation of the aim to provide all necessary medical treatment to domesticated animals everywhere

·      Increased material support for animal sanctuaries and rehoming projects

·      Prioritisation of the adoption of abandoned companion animals, as opposed to the continued breeding of more

·      A ban on breeding practices that involve the development and/or maintenance of congenital health problems

·      Introduction of humane spaying/neutering programmes where appropriate

·      Public education and support programmes that teach effective non-violent training/behavioural interaction techniques for domestic animals

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of animals to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that we are all potentially able to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of animal oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by indigenous people. However the process of ending the denigration of animals (recognising that the current pass we are at has been a long time in the making) and creating a world where respect for the autonomy and wellbeing of animals is honoured is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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SOLIDARITY WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLE STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to Indigenous people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by specific oppressions are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Globally Indigenous people have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to white supremacy. To further these approaches we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social category of indigenous people spans the globe and speaks of a huge diversity of peoples, nations and cultures (and is a term that did not originate from indigenous people themselves although a number of peoples now use it in the course of their struggles for respect and autonomy)

·      Recognition that indigenous people are almost always people of colour and that these two social categories meet and merge in complex ways

·      Recognition that many of indigenous peoples’ rightful lands have either been stolen from them or are violently contested

·      Recognition that indigenous people are subject to markedly high rates of physical violence based upon their identity

·      Recognition that indigenous people are subject to markedly high rates of sexual violence based upon their identity

·      Recognition that indigenous people are subject to markedly high rates physical violence and control from state agencies based upon their identity

·      Recognition that indigenous people are systemically disenfranchised from societal power, especially on a global scale

·      Recognition that caring work by indigenous people goes largely unrecompensed

·      Recognition that indigenous people are consistently economically devalued and impoverished

·      Recognition that indigenous people are consistently depicted in racist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of indigenous people into account or respect their bodily autonomy

·      Recognition that white supremacy does not necessarily prevent indigenous people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that white supremacy places untenable and contradictory demands upon indigenous people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by indigenous people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by indigenous people

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Immediate recognition of the currently existing territories of all indigenous peoples everywhere and respect for those boundaries #endlandtheftnow

·      Recognition by other nation states and state authorities of indigenous peoples and nations right to political autonomy/self-governance free from interference

·      A process that begins the at times straightforward and at times complex process of returning stolen lands to indigenous peoples

·      Payment of reparations by nation states to indigenous people they colonised and murdered

·      End to exploitative free trade deals that override existing and established indigenous treaty rights

·      Cessation of the patenting of plants and other medicinal, culinary etc. substances traditionally used by indigenous peoples for corporate gain

·      Prevention of the promotion of fascist ideas and public gatherings #nopasaran

·      Defunding the police

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

·      Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, racist hate speech and physical racist attacks 

·      Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse and violence

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against indigenous people

·      A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of indigenous people in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for indigenous people

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups with indigenous people

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of indigenous people’s bodily autonomy 

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard that leads with and/or integrates indigenous healing practices depending upon desire and cirumstance

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that includes an end to eugenic practices, non-consensual surgeries and experimentation)

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      Insurance that all indigenous communities have access to clean, potable water

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of indigenous people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that indigenous people are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by indigenous people. However the process of ending white supremacy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over hundreds of years) and creating a world where respect for the autonomy of indigenous peoples is honoured is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute.

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SOLIDARITY WITH LGBTIQA+ OR QUEER PEOPLE STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public programme we want to extend solidarity to LGBTIQA+/ Queer people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. LGBTIQA+ movement in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to prejudice and violence against LGBTIQA+ people. To further these approaches we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social category of LGBTIQA+ people or queer people is a both complex and evolving one and yet is simultaneously anchored in very specific historical struggles and identities

·      Recognition that other social categories of people are in a variety of complex inter-relationships with queer desire and identities

·      Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are subject to physical violence based upon their queer identities

·      Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are subject to sexual violence based upon their queer identities

·      Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies based upon their identities

·      Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are systemically disenfranchised from societal power

·      Recognition that intimate relationships and shared sexuality between LGBTIQA+ people are societally devalued

·      Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are - as an overall social grouping - comparatively economically devalued and impoverished

·      Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are consistently depicted in homophobic, biphobic, transphobic, misogynistic and demeaning ways – including disrespectful attitudes towards intersex, questioning, non-binary and asexual people - via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of LGBTIQA+ people into account or respect their bodily autonomy

·      Recognition that patriarchy does not necessarily prevent LGBTIQA+ people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon LGBTIQA+ people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by LGBTIQA+ people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by LGBTIQA+ people

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, hate speech and physical attacks against LGBTIQA+ people 

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against LGBTIQA+ people

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

·      A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of LGBTIQA+ people in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for LGBTIQA+ people

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups for LGBTIQA+ people

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of LGBTIQA+ people’s bodily autonomy

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that includes recognition of the specific needs of LGBTIQA+ people

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of LGBTIQA+ people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that LGBTIQA+ people are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by LGBTIQA+ people. However, the process of ending these multiple forms of oppression against LGBTIQA+ people and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all sexual orientations and genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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SOLIDARITY WITH MEN STATEMENT 

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to men via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Feminist movements in the UK and globally have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to patriarchy. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social category of men encompasses both great diversity of experience and is a basis for true solidarity and brotherhood

·      Recognition that trans men are men

·      Recognition that the social category of men meets and merges with other lived experiences such as being non-binary and genderqueer in complex ways

·      Recognition that men are subject to systemic physical violence that is based upon their identity e.g. via forced recruitment to the military, social normalisation of physical fighting as a way to resolve conflict etc. 

·      Recognition that men and boys are subject to sexual violence 

·      Recognition that men and boys are systemically disenfranchised from societal power, although not on the basis of their masculine identity

·      Recognition that men’s caring work goes largely unrecompensed

·      Recognition that men are consistently economically devalued and impoverished, although not as a societal group as a whole

·      Recognition that men and boys are consistently depicted in dehumanising ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.) whilst simultaneously being celebrated and centralised in ways that women are not

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take men’s needs into account or respect men’s bodily autonomy, whilst also acknowledging that mainstream medicine continues to be premised on a male-centric model

·      Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon men as men which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that patriarchy encourages and supports men to abuse power they hold over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that men’s direct and lateral communication that is supportive of feminist ideas is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by men

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Fully funded and active support for the movement to end violence against women and girls

·      Full radical reform of public sex education to a consent and pleasure based model

·      Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse or violence

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against men of all identities

·      Adequate societal checks against and support for individuals who perpetrate violence against women and girls

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of men’s bodily autonomy

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice

·      Free provision of high-quality nursery and childcare

·      Extension of the time periods available for paid paternity/ primary carer/maternity leave from work

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

·      An increase in societal support for men to engage in processes of personal and collective examination around the structural and personal effects of patriarchal social conditioning and play their part in generating necessary change

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups with the above processes

·      An immediate end to the military industrial complex – war solves nothing

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of men to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

 The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people of all gender identities are uniquely placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of men’s oppression. The process of ending patriarchy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over thousands of years of existence) and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility to which we can all directly contribute. 

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SOLIDARITY WITH PEOPLE OF COLOUR STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to people of colour via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Anti-racist movements in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to white supremacy. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social category, people of colour, is both a commonly used term and also a contested one which encompasses a great diversity of experience. A commonly used definition is: People of colour are people of South & East Asian, mixed, Romany, Black and Middle Eastern heritage and Indigenous peoples of Australasia, the Americas, the islands of the Atlantic & the Indian pacific – all of the many different peoples who are the majority of the world.

·      Recognition that other social categories of people are racialised (for example on a xenophobic or cultural basis) and that this meets and merges with the term people of colour in complex ways

·      Recognition that people of colour are subject to a greater amount of physical violence than white people

·      Recognition that people of colour are subject to a greater amount of sexual violence than white people

·      Recognition that people of colour are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies than white people

·      Recognition that people of colour are systemically disenfranchised from societal power, especially on a global scale

·      Recognition that caring work by people of colour goes largely unrecompensed

·      Recognition that people of colour are consistently economically devalued and impoverished

·      Recognition that people of colour are consistently depicted in racist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of people of colour into account or respect their bodily autonomy

·      Recognition that white supremacy does not necessarily prevent people of colour from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that white supremacy places untenable and contradictory demands upon people of colour which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by people of colour on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by people of colour

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Payment of reparations by wealthy nation states to those they colonised and enslaved

·      Cancellation of all international debts and an end to structural adjustment policies

·      Prevention of the promotion of fascist ideas and public gatherings #nopasaran

·      Defunding the police

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

·      Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, racist hate speech and physical racist attacks

·      Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse and violence

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against people of colour

·      A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of people of colour in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for people of colour

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups with people of colour

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of people of colour’s bodily autonomy

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that includes an end to eugenic practices, non-consensual surgeries and experimentation)

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of people of colour to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people of colour are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by people of colour. However, the process of ending white supremacy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over hundreds of years) and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all races and cultures is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. Within this collective movement white people have particular responsibilities to work to bring about the end of white supremacy. This entails acting in solidarity with people of colour, challenging the functioning of white privilege and dismantling racism within white social circles and institutions.

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SOLIDARITY WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public and Local Organising programmes, we want to extend solidarity to People with Disabilities via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. The Disabled People’s Movement in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to prejudice and violence against them. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social categories of people with disabilities are both complex and evolving ones and yet simultaneously anchored in very specific historical struggles and identities

·      Recognition that some disabilities are visible and others are invisible

·      Recognition that other social categories of people are in a variety of complex interrelationships with Disabled identities

·      Recognition that people with disabilities are subject to higher rates of physical violence than able bodied people

·      Recognition that people with disabilities are subject to higher rates of sexual violence than able bodied people

·      Recognition that people with disabilities are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies than able bodied people

·      Recognition that people with disabilities are systemically disenfranchised from societal power

·      Recognition that intimate relationships and shared sexuality between people with disabilities are societally devalued

·      Recognition that people with disabilities are - as an overall social grouping - comparatively economically devalued and impoverished

·      Recognition that people with disabilities are consistently depicted in ableist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of people with disabilities into account or respect their bodily autonomy

·      Recognition that ableism does not necessarily prevent people with disabilities from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that ableism places untenable and contradictory demands upon people with disabilities which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by people with disabilities on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by people with disabilities 

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, hate speech and physical attacks against people with disabilities

·      A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of people with disabilities in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for people with disabilities (and by default an end to the curtailment of people with disabilities’ culture as exemplified by the 1880 Milan Conference ban on deaf sign language)

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups for people with disabilites

·      A re-organisation of our built environments to accommodate the needs of people with limited mobility

·      A societal wide commitment to integrating access needs into every area of public life

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Recognition of and appropriate support for the specific needs of people with disabilities and/or ill health (failure to do so, as with recent austerity policies in the UK are a form of genocide against people with disabilities)

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of people with disabilities’ bodily autonomy

·      Such healthcare provision would include access to desired surgeries, medications and freedom from non-consensual surgeries and medications

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (inclusive of the needs of people with disabilities that includes an end to eugenic practices, non-consensual surgeries and experimentation)

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of people with disabilities to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of capitalism, white supremacy and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people with disabilities are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by people with disabilities. However, the process of ending multiple forms of oppression against people with disabilities and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all types of physicality is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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 SOLIDARITY WITH PLANET EARTH STATEMENT

 

                                                          we

a glowing sphere in the depth of space

echoing spirals edge

repeating

shifting

in the immediacy of breath

 

no homage is too great

for all that we are

 

our marbling

in dappled coat of lemur

otter, wet mink

deep sea turbulence

 

the peaceful colours of life

blue, green, white

bejewelled black

 

soil

changing through aeons

in our hands

 

continued good fortune

despite

until

even

 

our passing

agape with tears

of cow, whale, human

 

with such grief

we reform

remould

continue

 

in love

with our tiny

cohesive

multiplicities

 

 

 

As part of Arika’s shared beliefs we want to speak about our understanding of our relationship with our planet. 

 

We know that as individuals and as humans we are not separate from the earth but are part of it. 

 

The mysteries of life are within both us and the whole earth.

 

Human understanding, knowledge and wisdom about planet earth has ebbed and flowed, expanded and contracted, shifted forms over thousands of years.

 

All forms of poetry, mathematics, philosophy, dance, gesture, gaze, community, architecture, painting, sciences, experimentation, writing, speech, memory, touch, divination, movement, journeying, worship, religion, medicine, ecstasy, spirituality, sculpture, visions, foretelling reciprocated and initiated by humans stem from our larger whole. Our bodies move between life and death. 

 

Without the continuation of biologic life on earth, human societies will not continue.

 

All forms of expression, exploration and endeavour are relevant in the daunting task of averting catastrophic climate change and halting the devastatingly rapid loss of species diversity. 

 

Time is of the essence when it comes to delimiting climate change to the degree that it may be possible for mammalian life to continue on this planet.

 

It may seem that the solutions to our predicament lie solely on the physical plane – reducing C02 output, finding alternate forms of energy generation, methods to biologically digest plastic waste etc.  If all of human ingenuity was applied to our difficulties no doubt we would be astonished at the technological solutions revealed. However our societal inequalities, wars, economic competition, oppression and mistrust of one another prevent us from addressing this – our globally shared and most urgent disaster. So the solutions to our crisis are multifold – until we can cooperate with one another we cannot bring about the practical changes we need to save ourselves. We cannot co-operate sufficiently to address climate change as long as oppressive hierarchical social structures predominate - so dramatic change is necessary on all levels: political, cultural, spiritual and practical. 

 

Terrible damage is already unfolding. The question is now can we collectively respond in a way that will enable some form of life to continue? We have less than 10 years.

 

Without proscribing what exact forms solutions to anthropogenic climate change would comprise, we advocate recognition of the following:

 

(For our thoughts on addressing loss of species diversity please refer to our Solidarity with Animals Statement)

 

·      Our world is catching fire

·      Currently no scientific body of national or international standing disputes the existence and critical nature of climate change.

·      The global north bears more direct responsibility for climate change than the global south. The world’s richest 1% emit double the carbon of the poorest 50%.

·      The global south bears the harder brunt of climate change in terms of loss of lives and wellbeing.

·      There is no realistic chance that the human technological development necessary for space colonisation will outpace our current rate of environmental destruction. Our collective fate, for better or worse, rests here on this planet. 

·      Rising to the challenge of averting fully disastrous climate change involves those of us living lifestyles that involve comparatively high levels of resource consumption, in the form of the world’s harvest and extracted substances of the earth, reducing our appetites. 

·      Despite the emergence of multiple studies in the 1960’s acknowledging and predicting problematic anthropomorphic climate change, plus ever increasing consensus on the subject by scientists in the 1970’s governments and industrial bodies did not (in general) respond constructively. Instead companies commissioned research into climate change and utilised this knowledge to make adaptions such raising the height of oil drilling platforms to accommodate for rising sea levels. They continued to promote fossil fuel consumption and draw profit from this with full knowledge of the devastating consequences. Throughout the 1980’s all major fossil fuel companies continued to meet regularly to discuss current scientific research on climate change, plan adaptive industry responses and strategise to misinform the public about the realities of climate change. 

·      Climate change denial is hindering our collective mobilisation to address this issue. It is generated by a well-funded coalition of fossil fuel companies, industry groups, conservative think tanks and a tiny handful of scientists.

·      World leaders are not to be trusted. Governments are not to be trusted. Billionaires and millionaires are not to be trusted. 

·      Fossil fuel companies are willing to take us all to hell for a short-term profit.

·      Tackling climate change involves acknowledging the enormous degree of irretrievable loss that has already occurred: both human and animal lives lost, animal species forever gone, landmasses that were generational homes beneath the waves, crops lost, livelihoods gone, traditional ways of life gone, starvation creeping over, insects leaving this plane of existence, a poisoning of lifes’ possibilities.

·      Tackling and responding to climate change requires co-operation on a global scale.

·      Solutions also need to be and have the capacity to be appropriate to the specific requirements of local environments and human cultures.

·      Reducing or stabilising global human population levels would assist significantly with addressing climate change. All ethical consideration and empirical research leads to the overarching conclusion that this must be done with the aim of enhancing bodily and personal autonomy of women and girls, not further degrading it. Ensuring reproductive justice is the key solution. 

·      Indigenous peoples are politically active in conserving natural environments and combatting climate change. The territories of the world’s 370 million indigenous peoples cover 24% of land worldwide, and contain 80% of the world’s biodiversity. 

·      Constant economic growth is not sustainable. Capitalism is not sustainable.

 

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering, save lives and have a significant and positive effect in halting irredeemable climate change:

 

·      Think global, act local!

·      Reduce, reuse, recycle.

·      Divestment from fossil fuels and nuclear energy – coal, oil and gas burning is the main cause of climate change. 

·      Leave coal in the earth. 

·      Leave oil in the earth. 

·      Leave gas in the earth. 

·      Stop all fracking now.

·      Prevent the fossil fuel, nuclear, chemical, banking and motor industries from distorting collective decisions making away from rational and effective solutions to climate change; they act to of serve their own short term interests

·      Transfer to renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, hydropower etc. 

·      Support people working in environmentally damaging industries to retrain and transition to work in sustainable areas of their choice. For example, here in Scotland a transition training fund supported unemployed former oil and gas workers to retrain and enter sustainable industries.

·      Support and solidarity for all organised action against fossil fuel companies, whether it takes the form of litigation or direct action

·      Eliminate food waste

·      Reduce world population numbers via: 

o   access to reproductive justice for women

o   full educational opportunities for women and girls

o   economic empowerment of women

o   equitable access to political power for women and girls 

o   an end to societal tolerance of violence against women and girls

·      Remove subsidies from fossil fuel and meat industries

·      Reduce meat consumption

·      Support indigenous peoples’ lives and struggles to protect their lands and cultural autonomy (for further thoughts on this see our Indigenous People statement) 

·      Protect existing forests and woodlands

·      Wherever possible ensure reforestation of previously forested areas felled by humans

·      Protect global peat land masses – ban all but sustainable palm oil production, eliminate hobby garden use of peat and create environmental sanctuaries in peat based land masses

·      Protect and expand protected land environments – this will reduce species extinction and increase the possibilities for future generations to regenerate our legacy of loss

·      Protect and expand protected marine environments – this will reduce species extinction help to restore the oceans natural balance

·      Thoughtfully reintroduce indigenous animal species to areas where they have been eliminated by humans – their presence will help to heal the environment as a whole

·      Utilise Greenfreeze (invented by Greenpeace) fridges – conventional refrigeration is one of the major contributors to climate change

·      Mass increase of microgeneration projects – roof top solar, small-scale hydropower

·      Increase silvopasture – this method of cattle husbandry is preferable to field grazing or barn raising 

·      No second homes – this is no time for self-indulgence of the wealthy

·      End all low paid, sweatshop and slave labour

·      Support union power and encourage its revolutionary tendencies. We the people need to control the means of production

·      Shift from industrial farming methods that are destroying the soil and releasing tons of CO2 into the atmosphere to organic and regenerative methods. Modern organic farming produces crop yields similar to conventional agriculture but avoids the use of synthetic chemical inputs, genetically modified organisms, and antibiotics, while choosing management practices that support biodiversity, soil fertility, and human and environmental health. 

·      Create safe cycle routes

·      Create and protect safe walking routes

·      Create strong public free or affordable public transport infrastructures

·      Convert public transport to electrical modes

·      Bring about a rapid phase out of private ICE vehicles and convert to hybrid, electrical and biodiesel modes

·      Establish as many local networks of food production and distribution as possible

·      Increase vegetable gardening at home

·      Compost all human and animal excrement

·      Feed carnivorous pets on a mainly chicken based diet

·      Increase houseplants in home and work spaces

·      Don’t drink bottled water

·      Avoid unnecessary consumption – every object involves extractive, manufacturing and distribution processes that contribute to climate change. 

·      Ban all unnecessary packaging

·      Manufacture all items that can be made from sustainable materials in that form instead of plastic

·      Reduce air traffic – in the UK 15% of our negative impact upon the climate comes from aviation. And 70% of flights are taken by the same 15% of wealthy fliers. 

·      Ban all domestic flights apart from emergency use

·      Reduce air freight

·      Reduce international travel by introducing frequent a flier levy

·      Reduce internet use (which accounts for approximately 10% of the world’s energy consumption)– specifically reduce video calls and stream in standard as opposed to high definition

·      Reduce water usage

·      Invest in investigating alternate and less developed methods of generating electricity such as piezoelectric 

·      Invest in investigating alternate and less developed technologies that generate environmentally friendly solutions to the many driving forces behind climate change

·      Expose sham solutions such as polluting companies paying to “offset” their damage by ostensibly protecting existing forests etc. 

·      Make sure all housing and public building is effectively insulated with non-toxic, safe materials

·      Create legal obligations for the building industry to follow best practice to eliminate excessive waste from building processes

·      Update building code to ensure minimum heat wastage

·      Challenge the constant pressure to dispose of functional clothes generated by the fashion industry. Creative self-expression through personal style doesn’t involve following annual trends generated by wealthy fashion houses – au contraire!

·      Bring land ownership into collectively accountable forms – e.g. support collective or charitable buy outs, support a return to crofting, restrict individual or corporate ownership of large areas of land, allow for allotments…

·      In countries, such as the UK, which no longer have the land mass available to generate enough food choose the most responsible methods of food importation and distribution 

·      Recognise that many people are forced to migrate or flee due to the direct or knock on effects of climate change – have Scotland welcome new migrants

·      Every sizeable and/or funded organisation needs to monitor, share, assess and remedy their involvement in climate change and take responsibility for being part of solutions

·      Be part of generating fruitful and kind-hearted philosophical, spiritual, political, personal, collective discussions about ways of understanding human’s interconnected relationship with our planet that challenge unexamined hegemonic worldviews. 

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SOLIDARITY WITH TRANS, INTERSEX AND NON-BINARY PEOPLE STATEMENT 

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public and Local organising programmes we want to extend solidarity to Trans, Intersex and Non-Binary people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Trans, non-binary and intersex movement in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to prejudice and violence against them. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social categories of Trans, non-binary and intersex people are both complex and evolving ones and yet simultaneously anchored in very specific historical struggles and identities

·      Recognition that other social categories of people are in a variety of complex interrelationships with trans, non-binary and intersex desire and identities

·      Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are subject to high rates of physical violence based upon their identities

·      Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are subject to sexual violence based upon their identities

·      Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies based upon their identities

·      Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are systemically disenfranchised from societal power

·      Recognition that intimate relationships and shared sexuality between trans, non-binary and intersex people are societally devalued

·      Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are - as an overall social grouping - comparatively economically devalued and impoverished

·      Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are consistently depicted in transphobic and demeaning ways – including disrespectful attitudes towards intersex and non-binary people - via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art, TV & radio broadcasting etc.)

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of trans, non-binary and intersex people into account or respect their bodily autonomy

·      Recognition that patriarchy does not necessarily prevent trans, non-binary and intersex people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon trans, non-binary and intersex people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by trans, non-binary and intersex people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by trans, non-binary and intersex people

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, hate speech and physical attacks against trans, non-binary and intersex people 

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against trans, non-binary and intersex people

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

·      A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of trans, non-binary and intersex people in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for trans, non-binary and intersex people

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups for trans, non-binary and intersex people

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of trans, non-binary and intersex people’s bodily autonomy

·      Such healthcare provision would include access to desired surgeries, medications and freedom from non-consensual surgeries and medications

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that is inclusive of the needs of trans people of all genders, non-binary people and intersex people)

·      Exemplary training created in consultation with trans, non-binary and intersex people to ensure that all medical staff undergo thorough awareness training in conjunction with a robust independent complaints procedure to ensure trans, non-binary and intersex people feel safe to access medical services

·      With regards the ongoing proposed reforms to gender recognition, we support self-ID for trans, non-binary and intersex people, acknowledging that the current processes for obtaining gender recognition are overly complex, prolonged and demeaning

·      Formal recognition of non-binary identities alongside well thought out provision of services and spaces for non-binary people

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of trans, non-binary and intersex people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of patriarchy, capitalism and white supremacy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that trans, non-binary and intersex people are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by trans, non-binary and intersex people. However, the process of ending multiple forms of oppression against trans, non-binary and intersex people and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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SOLIDARITY WITH WOMEN STATEMENT 

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to women via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Feminist movements in the UK and globally have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about and end to patriarchy. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the social category of women encompasses both great diversity of experience and a basis for true sisterhood 

·      Recognition that trans women are women

·      Recognition that the social category of women meets and merges with other lived experiences such as being non-binary and genderqueer in complex ways

·      Recognition that women are subject to a greater amount of physical violence than any other single social group

·      Recognition that women and girls are subject to a greater amount of sexual violence than any other single social group

·      Recognition that women and girls are systemically disenfranchised from societal power

·      Recognition that women’s caring work goes largely unrecompensed

·      Recognition that women are consistently economically devalued and impoverished

·      Recognition that women and girls are consistently depicted in sexist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)

·      Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take women’s range of specific needs into account or respect women’s bodily autonomy

·      Recognition that patriarchy does not necessarily prevent women from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon women as women which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that women’s direct and lateral communication on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by women

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      Fully funded and active support for the movement to end violence against women and girls

·      Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse or violence

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against women

·      Full radical reform of public sex education to a consent and pleasure based model

·      Adequate societal checks against and support for individuals who perpetrate violence against women and girls

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

·      Provision of a universal basic income

·      Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of women’s bodily autonomy

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice

·      Free provision of high quality nursery and childcare

·      Extension of the time periods available for paid maternity/paternity/ primary carer leave from work

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

·      A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of women in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for women

·      Active solidarity from other all other social groups with women

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of women to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of patriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that women are uniquely placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by women and people with lived experiences of sexism. However, the process of ending patriarchy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over thousands of years of existence) and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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 SOLIDARITY WITH WORKING CLASS PEOPLE STATEMENT

 

As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public and local organising programmes we want to extend solidarity to working class people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by specific oppressions are those best placed to develop methods to overcome them. Globally working class people have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to capitalism and various oppressions. To further these aims we first advocate for:

 

·      Recognition that the category of working class people is both contended and subject to ongoing exploration but (if meaningful) spans the globe and encompasses a huge diversity of peoples, nations and cultures

·      Recognition that (to simplify) this term could either encompass:

o   People who do not own the means of production and are reliant on selling their labour to those who do to gain the necessities of life

o   People who - in the context of the nation state in which they dwell - have comparatively less economic and social resources (in the form of income, property, cultural capital, social influence, educational opportunities, material possessions etc.) 

And further:

o   That denigrating cultural mystification has been built up around people with less wealth and power, primarily by people who have more of both.

o   That these various beliefs that entail class prejudice intersect in complex ways with other forms of oppression – ableism, racism, sexism, transphobia, homophobia, xenophobia etc. 

·      Recognition whether one adheres to either definition i) or ii) working class people encompass the majority of the world and as such include people from a multiplicity of cultural heritages, racial origins, genders, bodies, sexualities etc. 

·      Recognition that the definition of working class that states - People who do not own the means of production and are reliant on selling their labour to those who do in order to gain the necessities of life - holds enormous revolutionary potential; highlighting as it does the fact that the vast majority of people are disenfranchised from economic and political power. It emphasises the hierarchical nature of a class-based society and that only a tiny minority hold significant power within such a structure. Stemming from political analysis that exhorts us to create a society without class divisions it asserts the potential to make common cause between the vast majority of the world’s population. 

·      Recognition that the definition of working class which states - People who - in the context of the nation state in which they dwell - have comparatively less economic and social resources (in the form of income, property, cultural capital, social influence, educational opportunities, material possessions etc.) – speaks to the significance of the stratification of power and resources that exist in a class based society. It opens space to explore and challenge the specific insights, experiences, misrepresentation, disadvantages and oppression of working class peoples’ (aka lower income) lives. It avoids the pitfalls of collapsing distinct experiences into one false amalgamation and allows for a nuanced analysis of how the class system functions. Yet a more purely sociological analysis of class also carries the risk of ignoring the inherent structural violence of capitalism and the collective suffering it brings.

·      Recognition that globally most working class people are people of colour 

·      Recognition that globally most working class people live in the global south

·      Recognition that globally most working class people are women

·      Recognition that the majority of disabled people are working class 

·      Recognition that the creation and maintenance of the current class system is dependent upon patriarchy and white supremacy 

 

 

From this point on in this solidarity statement we wish to focus on the definition “All people who - in the context of the nation state in which they dwell - have comparatively less economic and social resources (in the form of income, property, cultural capital, social influence, educational opportunities, material possessions etc.)” in order to bring meaningful focus to the class stratification of our society here in the Scotland/UK.

 

·      Recognition that working class people suffer more – from ill health, earlier mortality (as both babies, children and adults), inferior health care, more dangerous working conditions, less personal autonomies, poor accommodation, more polluted living environments etc. 

·      Recognition that the working class people are more subject to state violence and control e.g. police repression etc. 

·      Recognition that working class people are subject to denigrating representations e.g. dirty, lewd, over-sexual, loud, indiscriminating, greedy, stupid, quick to anger, mindless, lacking in self-control, inarticulate, fawning, undisciplined, selfish, over-numerous, teeming, criminal, suppressed, insensitive, dishonest, servile, over-emotional, failed, lazy, sentimental, unreliable, stolid, plodding, lumpen, rough, comedic, foolish, genetically inferior, drunken, crass, monstrous, fatalistic, voiceless, ugly, rude, possessed of poor taste, sly, manipulative, immoral, thieving, looting, demanding, dangerous, reckless, macho, inclined to a mob mentality, incapable of analysis, messy, sick, unhygienic, cruel, brutish, animalistic, instinctive, irrational, restless, superstitious, inferior, expendable – other and lesser than. 

·      Recognition that this list of negative traits associated with working class people can be subject to converse romanticisation and fetishisation, with attendant dehumanisation. 

·      Recognition that cultural signifiers such as accent, language, spoken vernacular, specific art forms, specific sports associated with working class identity will be often interpreted in a critical or fetishised way, as detailed above.

·      Recognition that all these stereotypes intersect with racist, sexist, ableist, trans/homophobic etc. ideas in a most frequently toxic brew

·      Recognition that the class system places untenable and contradictory demands upon working class people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm

·      Recognition that the realities of working class life are systemically mispresented via public communication mediums e.g. journalism, entertainment and academic publications. 

·      Recognition that working class people are systematically disenfranchised from participating in these channels of communication

·      Recognition that working class people are systematically disenfranchised from participating in mediums of communication frequently called the arts – i.e. dance, theatre, writing, visual arts, film, live performance etc. 

·      Recognition that when working class people do generate art in their own right it is frequently denied not only economic support and access to a larger public platform but often the very right to exist

·      Recognition that when working class people do generate art in their own right it is more frequently granted economic support and a larger public platform when the political views therein correlate closely with those approved by the ruling classes

·      Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by working class people

·      Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups

·      Recognition that capitalism does not necessarily prevent working class people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged

·      Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by working class people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view

 

We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:

 

·      A true global commitment to minimising the process of climate change as a matter of collective urgency

·      An immediate end to the military industrial complex – war solves nothing 

·      Reform that recognises and protects the lands, right to political autonomy/self-governance and cultures of indigenous peoples 

·      Payment of reparations by colonising nation states to those they colonised and enslaved

·      Cancellation of all international debts, exploitative free trade deals and structural adjustment policies

·      Reforms that begin to place land, workplaces, services and other vital resources into collective ownership

·      An immediate end to homelessness via the reallocation of unoccupied built property into collective ownership

·      Prevention of the promotion of fascist ideas and public gatherings #nopasaran

·      Defunding the police

·      An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power

·      Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, racist hate speech and physical racist attacks 

·      Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse and violence

·      Full radical reform of public sex education to a consent and pleasure based model

·      Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against working class people

·      Instigation of societal decision-making structures (e.g. democratic local assemblies) that enable mass participation in key decision-making processes

·      Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for working class people

·      Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of everyone’s bodily autonomy 

·      A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice

·      Cessation of the patenting of plants and other medicinal, culinary etc. substances that would be better held within the commons

·      Access for all to clean, potable water

·      Provision of a universal basic income (paid to all) at a rate that enables a good standard of living 

·      Decriminalisation of sex work

·      Rent caps on all rented property and an end to winter evictions

·      Payment of rent costs for all who need it 

·      Re-nationalisation of public transport

·      An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours

·      Free provision of high-quality nursery and childcare

·      Extension of the time periods available for paid paternity/ primary carer/maternity leave from work

·      Reform of grant giving processes and resource distribution for arts and/or community projects with the intent of de-professionalising and de-institutionalising the arts so that everyone can participate

·      Expansion of free educational opportunities for all both without and within existing bodies

 

 

The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of working class people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of capitalism, white supremacy and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  

 

The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that working class people – in the sense of those with the least economic resources and power - are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of oppression. However the process of ending capitalism and class hierarchies (recognising such hierarchies have existed, though not universally, over thousands of years) and creating a world where respect for the autonomy of all of us is honoured is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 

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BDS MOVEMENT STATEMENT

 

We want to publicly state our support and commitment to the cultural boycott of the state of Israel. This is because of the on-going genocide that Israel is perpetrating against the people of Palestine.

 

In 2005, Palestinian civil society issued a call for a campaign of boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS) against Israel until it complies with international law and allows Palestinian rights. We stand in solidarity with this call. By so doing we are part of an international movement that we hope will have a positive effect. We urge everyone to take this clear stand and to actively encourage others to join them.

 

The BDS call urges international artists, cultural workers and cultural organisations to boycott and work towards the cancellation of and activities that involve Israel, its lobby groups and complicit institutions or that whitewash Israel’s human rights violations. This is a boycott of Israeli cultural institutions not Israeli individuals. BDS targets complicity, not identity. The cultural boycott of Israel should continue until Israel meets the three demands of the BDS call. Israeli cultural institutions can avoid being targeted by the boycott if they meet the three demands of the BDS call and end all forms of support for Israeli violations of international law.

 

Arika boycotts:

·      Performances and exhibitions in Israel, except in certain situations 

·      All complicit Israeli cultural institutions 

·      Cultural products that are commissioned by an official Israeli body or a non-Israeli body that promotes Israel 

·      Events and activities that are sponsored by an official Israeli body or a complicit institution 

·      Normalization Projects 

·      Fact finding missions that are sponsored by Israel, Israeli institutions or lobby groups 

 

Thus we do not give support to any artists, academics, cultural bodies etc. (either in person or to cultural work of any sort produced by them) who accept funding from the Israeli state or Israeli corporate bodies. We are open to platforming cultural work produced within Israel that either offers explicit and valuable critique of the Israeli state and its military/security policies or is more lateral in nature, yet is nonetheless predicated upon such critiques. 

 

We wish to highlight that there are Israeli nationals who dissent from the racist, genocidal program of the Israeli state and also new migrants living within Israel who are struggling with racism, poverty etc. As an organisation we are willing to amplify their voices wherever possible. We believe by doing so we will continue to challenge the abuse of the Palestinian people as the Israeli state relies on curtailing dissenting opinions and maintaining racism within its borders as well as without. 

 

The majority of the 50,000 African asylum seekers in Israel are mostly fleeing from Eritrea and Sudan. Of them, only two individuals have been granted refugee status, contrasting with global refugee recognition rates that are approximately 80% for Eritreans and 62% for Sudanese. A pitiless anti-immigrant approach is demonstrated in the detention centres that imprison asylum seekers without any medical care. Migrants have been labelled with the same term applied to Palestinians – infiltrator. In 2010 the Israeli city of Eilat launched an anti-migrant campaign hanging 1,500 red flags around the city and hundreds of banners that read: “Protecting our home, the residents of Eilat are drawing the line on infiltration.” By 2012 a vast fence was built spanning from Eilat to the Gaza border and by 2017 no migrants crossed between Egypt and Israel, contravening international law in the form of the UN 1951 Refugee Convention (that protects refugees from being returned to country in which they face serious threat to life or freedom) to which Israel is a signatory. The UNHR continues to be critical of Israel’s failure to honour its legal obligations to refugees. 

 

We wish to emphasise that we condemn any form of anti-semitism and will never provide a platform for anti-semitic viewpoints.

 

Further reading on these areas can be found at:

 

http://bdsmovement.net/

https://bdsmovement.net/cultural-boycott

http://www.scottishpsc.org.uk/

http://www.scottishfriendsofpalestine.org/

https://www.972mag.com/nabi-saleh-is-where-i-lost-my-zionism/

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2011/04/2011412102514350535.html