Solidarity Statements

Posted on 12 Nov 2018
Solidarity Statements Overview
 
Arika believes the most important way to exchange solidarity is in practical, ongoing, tangible ways. We try to do this via both our local organising and public programmes. Local Organising involves long term partnerships with grassroots groups in which we co-operate to create events initiated and chosen by the groups. Our public events are always underpinned by a desire to explore processes that hold the potential to bring about an end to oppression and create a society based on love and respect. 
 
We want to create further political clarity and solidarity with all of the people with whom we co-operate to make our public programmes and hope that the following solidarity statements will assist with this. Intersectionality is a term created by black feminist scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw that illuminates “the need to account for multiple grounds of identity when considering how the social world is constructed”.  Clearly no one social identity exists in isolation from another and our identities intersect multiple social groups. This means that within any one social grouping a great variety of experience exists. Yet focusing on commonality of experience (as well as divergences) amongst social groupings has led to both fruitful analysis of oppression and empowerment for its members. We intend for the following statements to be read with this in mind. We also hope the following three definitions will be useful:
 
Capitalism is a global economic system where the means of production are owned by a minority (the capitalist class) and the majority (waged workers) sell their labour in order to gain means of survival. The goods and services produced by those who sell their labour are in turn sold for profit by the minority who own the means of production.
 
Patriarchy is a social system in which men hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. It supports the tendency of fathers (or father-figures) to hold authority over women and children within the domain of the family.
 
White Supremacy is an historically based, institutionally perpetuated system of exploitation and oppression of continents, nations, and peoples of colour by white peoples and nations of the European continent, for the purpose of maintaining and defending a system of wealth, power, and privilege. 
 
The following evolving statements set out some principles that structure our commitments to different groups and communities, and inform some of the ways we collaborate together. The below is also available as a PDF here.
 
 
Local Organising Specific Solidarity Statements
 
MIGRANT SOLIDARITY STATEMENT
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our Local Organising programme we want to extend solidarity to migrants via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Migrant led organisations in the UK have consistently sought:
 
A priority of movement for those fleeing war, torture and abuse
 
Recognition that the experience of poverty is in itself a form of violence and can prompt relocation
 
An end to detention
 
Provision of necessary means for a dignified, healthy, autonomous and fulfilled life
 
An end to the violence attending the maintenance of national boundaries
 
We are clear that change on a profound level is necessary for this to occur that would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers. 
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that the people best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions are those with lived experience of migration.  We know that these approaches and ideas are in a constantly evolving process – our aim is to be alongside this process in solidarity as best we can, not to shape it. This solidarity involves recognising that migrants without papers are struggling for the very basis of their lives; sometimes they engage in organised struggle and creating strategies of resistance – at others they are pressed to simply survive. Solidarity in this context involves people without lived experience of being in the (immigration) system doing as much as actively possible to be of assistance.
 
SEX WORKER SOLIDARITY STATEMENT 
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our Local Organising programme we want to extend solidarity to sex workers via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Sex worker led organisations in the UK have consistently sought:
 
Decriminalisation of sex work
 
Unionisation of the sex work industry
 
Recognition that sex work is work (like other all work it can bring both fulfillment and suffering dependent upon circumstances)
 
An end to the social stigma connected to sex work
 
We support all of these aims. We are clear that change on a profound level is necessary for this to occur that would entail the end of patriarchy, capitalism and white supremacy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers. 
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that the people best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions are those with lived experience of the industry.  We know that these approaches and ideas are in a constantly evolving process – our aim is to be alongside this process in solidarity as best we can, not to shape it. 
 
ANTI-POVERTY MOVEMENT SOLIDARITY STATEMENT
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our Local Organising programme, we want to extend solidarity to people experiencing poverty via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Organisations in the UK led by people with lived experience of poverty have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about its end. Drawing upon these we advocate:
 
Provision of necessary means for a dignified, healthy, autonomous and fulfilled life to all
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard
 
Collective control of our workplaces and the fruits of our labour
 
Restoration of land, non-residential buildings and items manufactured by conglomerates to collective ownership
 
The development of truly collective decision making on a societal wide level
 
We also recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Provision of a universal basic income (paid to all) at a rate that enables a good standard of living 
 
Recognition of and appropriate support for the specific needs of people with disabilities and/or ill health
 
Rent caps on all rented property and an end to winter evictions
 
Payment of rent costs for all who need it 
 
An immediate end to homelessness via the reallocation of unoccupied built property into collective ownership
 
Re-nationalisation of public transport
 
Payment of reparations by wealthy nation states to those they colonised and enslaved
 
Cancellation of all international debts and an end to structural adjustment policies
 
Solidarity with direct action against poverty - whether that be strike action, pickets, occupations or whatever those directly involved deem best
 
We are clear that change on a profound level is necessary for this to occur that would entail the end of capitalism, white supremacy and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers. 
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people with lived experience of poverty are the people uniquely placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around its eradication. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by people with lived experiences of poverty. However, the process of ending capitalism (a system to which poverty and exploitation are integral) and replacing it with a society based on principals of mutual aid and equitable distribution of resources is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
Solidarity Statements A-Z
 
SOLIDARITY WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLE STATEMENT
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to Indigenous people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by specific oppressions are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Globally Indigenous people have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to white supremacy. To further these approaches we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social category of indigenous people spans the globe and speaks of a huge diversity of peoples, nations and cultures (and is a term that did not originate from indigenous people themselves although a number of peoples now use it in the course of their struggles for respect and autonomy)
 
Recognition that indigenous people are almost always people of colour and that these two social categories meet and merge in complex ways
 
Recognition that many of indigenous peoples’ rightful lands have either been stolen from them or are violently contested
 
Recognition that indigenous people are subject to markedly high rates of physical violence based upon their identity
 
Recognition that indigenous people are subject to markedly high rates of sexual violence based upon their identity
 
Recognition that indigenous people are subject to markedly high rates physical violence and control from state agencies based upon their identity
 
Recognition that indigenous people are systemically disenfranchised from societal power, especially on a global scale
 
Recognition that caring work by indigenous people goes largely unrecompensed
 
Recognition that indigenous people are consistently economically devalued and impoverished
 
Recognition that indigenous people are consistently depicted in racist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of indigenous people into account or respect their bodily autonomy
 
Recognition that white supremacy does not necessarily prevent indigenous people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that white supremacy places untenable and contradictory demands upon indigenous people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by indigenous people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by indigenous people
 
Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Immediate recognition of the currently existing territories of all indigenous peoples everywhere and respect for those boundaries #endlandtheftnow
 
Recognition by other nation states and state authorities of indigenous peoples and nations right to political autonomy/self-governance free from interference
 
A process that begins the at times straightforward and at times complex process of returning stolen lands to indigenous peoples
 
Payment of reparations by nation states to indigenous people they colonised and murdered
 
End to exploitative free trade deals that override existing and established indigenous treaty rights
 
Cessation of the patenting of plants and other medicinal, culinary etc. substances traditionally used by indigenous peoples for corporate gain
 
Prevention of the promotion of fascist ideas and public gatherings #nopasaran
 
Defunding the police
 
An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power
 
Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, racist hate speech and physical racist attacks 
 
Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse and violence
 
Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against indigenous people
 
A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of indigenous people in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities
 
Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for indigenous people
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups with indigenous people
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of indigenous people’s bodily autonomy 
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard that leads with and/or integrates indigenous healing practices depending upon desire and cirumstance
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that includes an end to eugenic practices, non-consensual surgeries and experimentation)
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
Insurance that all indigenous communities have access to clean, potable water
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of indigenous people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that indigenous people are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by indigenous people. However the process of ending white supremacy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over hundreds of years) and creating a world where respect for the autonomy of indigenous peoples is honoured is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
SOLIDARITY WITH LGBTIQA+ OR QUEER PEOPLE STATEMENT
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public programme we want to extend solidarity to LGBTIQA+/ Queer people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. LGBTIQA+ movement in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to prejudice and violence against LGBTIQA+ people. To further these approaches we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social category of LGBTIQA+ people or queer people is a both complex and evolving one and yet is simultaneously anchored in very specific historical struggles and identities
 
Recognition that other social categories of people are in a variety of complex inter-relationships with queer desire and identities
 
Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are subject to physical violence based upon their queer identities
 
Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are subject to sexual violence based upon their queer identities
 
Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies based upon their identities
 
Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are systemically disenfranchised from societal power
 
Recognition that intimate relationships and shared sexuality between LGBTIQA+ people are societally devalued
 
Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are - as an overall social grouping - comparatively economically devalued and impoverished
 
Recognition that LGBTIQA+ people are consistently depicted in homophobic, biphobic, transphobic, misogynistic and demeaning ways – including disrespectful attitudes towards intersex, questioning, non-binary and asexual people - via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of LGBTIQA+ people into account or respect their bodily autonomy
 
Recognition that patriarchy does not necessarily prevent LGBTIQA+ people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon LGBTIQA+ people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by LGBTIQA+ people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by LGBTIQA+ people
 
Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, hate speech and physical attacks against LGBTIQA+ people 
 
Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against LGBTIQA+ people
 
An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power
 
A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of LGBTIQA+ people in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities
 
Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for LGBTIQA+ people
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups for LGBTIQA+ people
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of LGBTIQA+ people’s bodily autonomy
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that includes recognition of the specific needs of LGBTIQA+ people
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of LGBTIQA+ people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that LGBTIQA+ people are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by LGBTIQA+ people. However, the process of ending these multiple forms of oppression against LGBTIQA+ people and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all sexual orientations and genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
SOLIDARITY WITH MEN STATEMENT 
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to men via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Feminist movements in the UK and globally have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to patriarchy. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social category of men encompasses both great diversity of experience and is a basis for true solidarity and brotherhood
 
Recognition that trans men are men
 
Recognition that the social category of men meets and merges with other lived experiences such as being non-binary and genderqueer in complex ways
 
Recognition that men are subject to systemic physical violence that is based upon their identity e.g. via forced recruitment to the military, social normalisation of physical fighting as a way to resolve conflict etc. 
 
Recognition that men and boys are subject to sexual violence 
 
Recognition that men and boys are systemically disenfranchised from societal power, although not on the basis of their masculine identity
 
Recognition that men’s caring work goes largely unrecompensed
 
Recognition that men are consistently economically devalued and impoverished, although not as a societal group as a whole
 
Recognition that men and boys are consistently depicted in dehumanising ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.) whilst simultaneously being celebrated and centralised in ways that women are not
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take men’s needs into account or respect men’s bodily autonomy, whilst also acknowledging that mainstream medicine continues to be premised on a male-centric model
 
Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon men as men which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that patriarchy encourages and supports men to abuse power they hold over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that men’s direct and lateral communication that is supportive of feminist ideas is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by men
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Fully funded and active support for the movement to end violence against women and girls
 
Full radical reform of public sex education to a consent and pleasure based model
 
Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse or violence
 
Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against men of all identities
 
Adequate societal checks against and support for individuals who perpetrate violence against women and girls
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of men’s bodily autonomy
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice
 
Free provision of high-quality nursery and childcare
 
Extension of the time periods available for paid paternity/ primary carer/maternity leave from work
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
An increase in societal support for men to engage in processes of personal and collective examination around the structural and personal effects of patriarchal social conditioning and play their part in generating necessary change
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups with the above processes
 
An immediate end to the military industrial complex – war solves nothing
 
An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of men to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
 The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people of all gender identities are uniquely placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of men’s oppression. The process of ending patriarchy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over thousands of years of existence) and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
SOLIDARITY WITH PEOPLE OF COLOUR STATEMENT
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to people of colour via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Anti-racist movements in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to white supremacy. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social category, people of colour, is both a commonly used term and also a contested one which encompasses a great diversity of experience. A commonly used definition is: People of colour are people of South & East Asian, mixed, Romany, Black and Middle Eastern heritage and Indigenous peoples of Australasia, the Americas, the islands of the Atlantic & the Indian pacific – all of the many different peoples who are the majority of the world.
 
Recognition that other social categories of people are racialised (for example on a xenophobic or cultural basis) and that this meets and merges with the term people of colour in complex ways
 
Recognition that people of colour are subject to a greater amount of physical violence than white people
 
Recognition that people of colour are subject to a greater amount of sexual violence than white people
 
Recognition that people of colour are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies than white people
 
Recognition that people of colour are systemically disenfranchised from societal power, especially on a global scale
 
Recognition that caring work by people of colour goes largely unrecompensed
 
Recognition that people of colour are consistently economically devalued and impoverished
 
Recognition that people of colour are consistently depicted in racist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of people of colour into account or respect their bodily autonomy
 
Recognition that white supremacy does not necessarily prevent people of colour from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that white supremacy places untenable and contradictory demands upon people of colour which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by people of colour on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by people of colour
 
Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Payment of reparations by wealthy nation states to those they colonised and enslaved
 
Cancellation of all international debts and an end to structural adjustment policies
 
Prevention of the promotion of fascist ideas and public gatherings #nopasaran
 
Defunding the police
 
An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power
 
Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, racist hate speech and physical racist attacks
 
Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse and violence
 
Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against people of colour
 
A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of people of colour in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities
 
Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for people of colour
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups with people of colour
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of people of colour’s bodily autonomy
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that includes an end to eugenic practices, non-consensual surgeries and experimentation)
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of people of colour to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people of colour are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by people of colour. However, the process of ending white supremacy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over hundreds of years) and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all races and cultures is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. Within this collective movement white people have particular responsibilities to work to bring about the end of white supremacy. This entails acting in solidarity with people of colour, challenging the functioning of white privilege and dismantling racism within white social circles and institutions.
 
SOLIDARITY WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES STATEMENT
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public and Local Organising programmes, we want to extend solidarity to People with Disabilities via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. The Disabled People’s Movement in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to prejudice and violence against them. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social categories of people with disabilities are both complex and evolving ones and yet simultaneously anchored in very specific historical struggles and identities
 
Recognition that some disabilities are visible and others are invisible
 
Recognition that other social categories of people are in a variety of complex interrelationships with Disabled identities
 
Recognition that people with disabilities are subject to higher rates of physical violence than able bodied people
 
Recognition that people with disabilities are subject to higher rates of sexual violence than able bodied people
 
Recognition that people with disabilities are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies than able bodied people
 
Recognition that people with disabilities are systemically disenfranchised from societal power
 
Recognition that intimate relationships and shared sexuality between people with disabilities are societally devalued
 
Recognition that people with disabilities are - as an overall social grouping - comparatively economically devalued and impoverished
 
Recognition that people with disabilities are consistently depicted in ableist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of people with disabilities into account or respect their bodily autonomy
 
Recognition that ableism does not necessarily prevent people with disabilities from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that ableism places untenable and contradictory demands upon people with disabilities which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by people with disabilities on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by people with disabilities 
 
Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, hate speech and physical attacks against people with disabilities
 
A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of people with disabilities in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities
 
Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for people with disabilities (and by default an end to the curtailment of people with disabilities’ culture as exemplified by the 1880 Milan Conference ban on deaf sign language)
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups for people with disabilites
 
A re-organisation of our built environments to accommodate the needs of people with limited mobility
 
A societal wide commitment to integrating access needs into every area of public life
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Recognition of and appropriate support for the specific needs of people with disabilities and/or ill health (failure to do so, as with recent austerity policies in the UK are a form of genocide against people with disabilities)
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of people with disabilities’ bodily autonomy
 
Such healthcare provision would include access to desired surgeries, medications and freedom from non-consensual surgeries and medications
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (inclusive of the needs of people with disabilities that includes an end to eugenic practices, non-consensual surgeries and experimentation)
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of people with disabilities to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of capitalism, white supremacy and patriarchy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that people with disabilities are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by people with disabilities. However, the process of ending multiple forms of oppression against people with disabilities and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all types of physicality is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
SOLIDARITY WITH TRANS, INTERSEX AND NON-BINARY PEOPLE STATEMENT 
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and in conjunction with both our public and Local organising programmes we want to extend solidarity to Trans, Intersex and Non-Binary people via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Trans, non-binary and intersex movement in the UK and globally has suggested a variety of approaches to bring about an end to prejudice and violence against them. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social categories of Trans, non-binary and intersex people are both complex and evolving ones and yet simultaneously anchored in very specific historical struggles and identities
 
Recognition that other social categories of people are in a variety of complex interrelationships with trans, non-binary and intersex desire and identities
 
Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are subject to high rates of physical violence based upon their identities
 
Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are subject to sexual violence based upon their identities
 
Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are subject to a greater amount of physical violence and control from state agencies based upon their identities
 
Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are systemically disenfranchised from societal power
 
Recognition that intimate relationships and shared sexuality between trans, non-binary and intersex people are societally devalued
 
Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are - as an overall social grouping - comparatively economically devalued and impoverished
 
Recognition that trans, non-binary and intersex people are consistently depicted in transphobic and demeaning ways – including disrespectful attitudes towards intersex and non-binary people - via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art, TV & radio broadcasting etc.)
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take the range of specific needs of trans, non-binary and intersex people into account or respect their bodily autonomy
 
Recognition that patriarchy does not necessarily prevent trans, non-binary and intersex people from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon trans, non-binary and intersex people which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that the direct and lateral communication by trans, non-binary and intersex people on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by trans, non-binary and intersex people
 
Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Enforcement and/or development of legislation that aims to prevent discrimination, hate speech and physical attacks against trans, non-binary and intersex people 
 
Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against trans,non-binary and intersex people
 
An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power
 
A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of trans, non-binary and intersex people in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities
 
Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for trans, non-binary and intersex people
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups for trans, non-binary and intersex people
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of trans, non-binary and intersex people’s bodily autonomy
 
Such healthcare provision would include access to desired surgeries, medications and freedom from non-consensual surgeries and medications
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice (that is inclusive of the needs of trans people of all genders, non-binary people and intersex people)
 
Exemplary training created in consultation with trans, non-binary and intersex people to ensure that all medical staff undergo thorough awareness training in conjunction with a robust independent complaints procedure to ensure trans, non-binary and intersex people feel safe to access medical services
 
With regards the ongoing proposed reforms to gender recognition, we support self-ID for trans, non-binary and intersex people, acknowledging that the current processes for obtaining gender recognition are overly complex, prolonged and demeaning
 
Formal recognition of non-binary identities alongside well thought out provision of services and spaces for non-binary people
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of trans, non-binary and intersex people to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of patriarchy, capitalism and white supremacy. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that trans, non-binary and intersex people are best placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by trans, non-binary and intersex people. However, the process of ending multiple forms of oppression against trans, non-binary and intersex people and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
SOLIDARITY WITH WOMEN STATEMENT 
 
As part of Arika’s beliefs and specifically in conjunction with our public programme we want to extend solidarity to women via the following statement. Those most directly affected by a specific oppression are those best placed to develop methods to overcome it. Feminist movements in the UK and globally have suggested a variety of approaches to bring about and end to patriarchy. To further these approaches, we first advocate for:
 
Recognition that the social category of women encompasses both great diversity of experience and a basis for true sisterhood 
 
Recognition that trans women are women
 
Recognition that the social category of women meets and merges with other lived experiences such as being non-binary and genderqueer in complex ways
 
Recognition that women are subject to a greater amount of physical violence than any other single social group
 
Recognition that women and girls are subject to a greater amount of sexual violence than any other single social group
 
Recognition that women and girls are systemically disenfranchised from societal power
 
Recognition that women’s caring work goes largely unrecompensed
 
Recognition that women are consistently economically devalued and impoverished
 
Recognition that women and girls are consistently depicted in sexist and demeaning ways via mediums of public communication (e.g. film, advertising, visual art etc.)
 
Recognition that public healthcare frequently does not take women’s range of specific needs into account or respect women’s bodily autonomy
 
Recognition that patriarchy does not necessarily prevent women from having agency or abusing power over others and that whilst the greatest suffering is experienced by those who are directly oppressed, the oppressor too is damaged
 
Recognition that patriarchy places untenable and contradictory demands upon women as women which contributes to a culture of internalised oppression and self-harm
 
Recognition that women’s direct and lateral communication on the above areas of concern and many other matters is consistently invisibilised and actively eradicated from public view
 
Recognition that a vast expanse of culture, wisdom, art, joy, science and liberating insight has been generated by women
 
Recognition that these achievements are sometimes subject to cultural appropriation and commercial exploitation by more dominant social groups
 
We recognise that the following reforms would reduce suffering and save lives:
 
Fully funded and active support for the movement to end violence against women and girls
 
Support for all victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse or violence
 
Due diligence and investment of resources in investigating crimes against women
 
Full radical reform of public sex education to a consent and pleasure based model
 
Adequate societal checks against and support for individuals who perpetrate violence against women and girls
 
An immediate end to the prison industrial complex to be replaced with more humane ways of collectively preventing acts of violence and abuse of power
 
Provision of a universal basic income
 
Provision of suitable, safe, healthy accommodation on a universal basis
 
Access to free universal healthcare of a high standard with an inbuilt commitment to the support of women’s bodily autonomy
 
A societal wide commitment to reproductive justice
 
Free provision of high quality nursery and childcare
 
Extension of the time periods available for paid maternity/paternity/ primary carer leave from work
 
An end to workplace expectations that entail working anti-social and/or long hours
 
A process of affirmative action to ensure an equitable involvement of women in societal decision making and cultural processes and educational and employment opportunities
 
Affirmative action that involves the support of autonomous organisations/projects/culture/other provisions by and for women
 
Active solidarity from other all other social groups with women
 
The above listed reforms are both critical and yet inherently limited in nature. We are clear that for full liberation of women to come about change on a profound, revolutionary, level is necessary. For such changes to occur would entail the end of patriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism. This would involve collective re-organisation of society on a mass level and equitable redistribution of resources and decision-making powers.  
 
The process of struggling for these changes – both long term and immediate – is complex and takes place in challenging circumstances. We recognise that women are uniquely placed to develop effective strategies and guiding visions around the eradication of their oppression. Our intent is always to be especially mindful of the approaches and ideas recommended by women and people with lived experiences of sexism. However, the process of ending patriarchy (recognising that its effects have accumulated over thousands of years of existence) and creating a society based on principals of respect for people of all genders is inherently a matter of collective responsibility, to which we can all directly contribute. 
 
BDS Movement Statement
 
We want to publicly state our support and commitment to the cultural boycott of the state of Israel. This is because of the on-going genocide that Israel is perpetrating against the people of Palestine.
 
In 2005, Palestinian civil society issued a call for a campaign of boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS) against Israel until it complies with international law and allows Palestinian rights. We stand in solidarity with this call. By so doing we are part of an international movement that we hope will have a positive effect. We urge everyone to take this clear stand and to actively encourage others to join them.
 
The BDS call urges international artists, cultural workers and cultural organisations to boycott and work towards the cancellation of and activities that involve Israel, its lobby groups and complicit institutions or that whitewash Israel’s human rights violations. This is a boycott of Israeli cultural institutions not Israeli individuals. BDS targets complicity, not identity. The cultural boycott of Israel should continue until Israel meets the three demands of the BDS call. Israeli cultural institutions can avoid being targeted by the boycott if they meet the three demands of the BDS call and end all forms of support for Israeli violations of international law.
 
Arika boycotts:
Performances and exhibitions in Israel, except in certain situations 
 
All complicit Israeli cultural institutions 
 
Cultural products that are commissioned by an official Israeli body or a non-Israeli body that promotes Israel 
 
Events and activities that are sponsored by an official Israeli body or a complicit institution 
 
Normalization Projects 
 
Fact finding missions that are sponsored by Israel, Israeli institutions or lobby groups 
 
Thus we do not give support to any artists, academics, cultural bodies etc. (either in person or to cultural work of any sort produced by them) who accept funding from the Israeli state or Israeli corporate bodies. We are open to platforming cultural work produced within Israel that either offers explicit and valuable critique of the Israeli state and its military/security policies or is more lateral in nature, yet is nonetheless predicated upon such critiques. 
 
We wish to highlight that there are Israeli nationals who dissent from the racist, genocidal program of the Israeli state and also new migrants living within Israel who are struggling with racism, poverty etc. As an organisation we are willing to amplify their voices wherever possible. We believe by doing so we will continue to challenge the abuse of the Palestinian people as the Israeli state relies on curtailing dissenting opinions and maintaining racism within its borders as well as without. 
 
The majority of the 50,000 African asylum seekers in Israel are mostly fleeing from Eritrea and Sudan. Of them, only two individuals have been granted refugee status, contrasting with global refugee recognition rates that are approximately 80% for Eritreans and 62% for Sudanese. A pitiless anti-immigrant approach is demonstrated in the detention centres that imprison asylum seekers without any medical care. Migrants have been labelled with the same term applied to Palestinians – infiltrator. In 2010 the Israeli city of Eilat launched an anti-migrant campaign hanging 1,500 red flags around the city and hundreds of banners that read: “Protecting our home, the residents of Eilat are drawing the line on infiltration.” By 2012 a vast fence was built spanning from Eilat to the Gaza border and by 2017 no migrants crossed between Egypt and Israel, contravening international law in the form of the UN 1951 Refugee Convention (that protects refugees from being returned to country in which they face serious threat to life or freedom) to which Israel is a signatory. The UNHR continues to be critical of Israel’s failure to honour its legal obligations to refugees. 
 
We wish to emphasise that we condemn any form of anti-semitism and will never provide a platform for anti-semitic viewpoints.
 
Further reading on these areas can be found at: